Vue de La Face cachée de l’Archive , exposition des archives de Parkett , située dans la Galerie des Archives Vivantes, La Tour, LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers, France.

The Hidden Side of the Archive

Diane Arbus, Simon Fisher Turner, Nan Goldin, Derek Jarman, Annie Leibovitz

The Tower
Cherry Tree Gallery, Garden Level
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Testamentary wager, battle against finitude, testimony in extremis, rearrangement of time and other time-related equations are all at the heart of The Hidden Side of the Archive, which invites us to put aside our habits of analytical reflection and instead embrace a perception that is both emotional and empathic. The challenge here is no longer to define or to demonstrate, but to feel. The archive is then, beyond a memory, a mirror that is held up towards us.

In the wake of the 2017 exhibition Annie Leibovitz, The Early Years: 1970 - 1983, Archive Project # 1, the first exhibition of the Living Archives, The Hidden Side of the Archive offers an intimate and immersive dive into the works of Nan Goldin, Diane Arbus, Annie Leibovitz and Derek Jarman, a video artist who succumbed to AIDS in the early 90s. Alongside these artists, the contemporary avant-garde magazine Parkett unveils its special relationship with the eclectic artist Sigmar Polke.

With this new type of exhibition, the intention is to revitalise the archive and to give it a special reach in which time, the objective ally of the archive, imbues contents that are often tragic with the soothing softness of a murmur, of a confession.

In parallel, LUMA Arles is honoured to host the personal and obsessive archives of Hans-Ulrich Obrist in the context of an inspiring and moving presentation dedicated to Édouard Glissant.

The Hidden Side of the Archive is ultimately mine, in many respects.

Maja Hoffmann
Vue de La Face cachée de l’Archive, espace consacré à l’exposition La vie d’une photographe : 1990 - 2005 d’Annie Leibovitz, située dans la Galerie des Archives Vivantes, La Tour, LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers, France.

Vue de La Face cachée de l’Archive, espace consacré à l’exposition La vie d’une photographe : 1990 - 2005 d’Annie Leibovitz, située dans la Galerie des Archives Vivantes, La Tour, LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers, France.

Adrian Deweerdt

Artist biographies

Vue de La Face cachée de l’Archive, espace dédié à l’exposition The Cookie Mueller Portfolio (1976 – 1989) de Nan Goldin, située dans la Galerie des Archives Vivantes, La Tour, LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers, France.

Vue de La Face cachée de l’Archive, espace dédié à l’exposition The Cookie Mueller Portfolio (1976 – 1989) de Nan Goldin, située dans la Galerie des Archives Vivantes, La Tour, LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers, France.

Marc Domage

Diane Arbus

Diane Arbus is one of the most original and influential photographers of the twentieth century. She studied photography with Berenice Abbott, Alexey Brodovitch, and Lisette Model and had her first published photographs appear in Esquire in 1960. In 1963 and 1966 she was awarded John Simon Guggenheim Fellowships and was one of three photographers whose work was the focus of New Documents, John Szarkowski’s landmark exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art in 1967. Arbus’s depictions of couples, children, female impersonators, nudists, New York City pedestrians, suburban families, circus performers, and celebrities, among others, span the breadth of the postwar American social sphere and constitute a diverse and singularly compelling portrait of humanity. A year after her death, her work was selected for inclusion in the Venice Biennale, the first time any photographer had been so honored.

Arbus’s photographs can be found in the collections of numerous institutions around the world, including Art Gallery of Ontario, Canada; Art Institute of Chicago; Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris; Fotomuseum, Winterthur; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Pompidou, Paris; National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo; National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate Gallery, London; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

Simon Fisher Turner

Simon Fisher Turner is a composer and musician noted for his film soundtrack work which started in collaboration with Derek Jarman, scoring many of his films, including Caravaggio (1986); Last of England (1987); The Garden, 1990 and Jarman’s final work Blue (1993) ; as well the score for restorations of three silent films, Un chant d’amour, dir Jean Genet (1950), The Great White Silence, dir Herbert Ponting (1924) and The Epic of Everest, dir. Captain John Noel (1924). He received the Ivor Novello Award for the soundtrack to The Epic of Everest. As well as composing for films, he has performed extensively and released many albums the most recent of which is A Quiet Corner in Time a collaboration with the artist and author Edmund de Waal.

Édouard Glissant

Novelist, poet and essayist Édouard Glissant (1928-2011) is one of the great writers of the 20th and 21st centuries. As a young man in Martinique, Glissant was fascinated by the surrealist movement and, together with his friends from the Franc Jeu (a literary and political group), campaigned for the revolutionary ideas of colonial liberation. He left Martinique for metropolitan France in 1946 where he studied philosophy at the Sorbonne and ethnography at the Musée de l’Homme. He then published his first poetry collections (Un Champ d’îles in 1953) and his novel La Lézarde [translated into English by Frances Frenaye under the title The Ripening, published by G. Brazeller, New York.], which received the Prix Renaudot in 1958. In 1965, Glissant returned to Martinique.

In 1967, he created the Institut Martiniquais d’Études (IME), a private educational institution which aims to provide young Antilleans with an education that reflects the reality of their History and geography. In 1971, he founded the journal Acoma (published by Maspero), a critical research journal on Antillean societies, which already heralded one of his major essays in this field at that time, Le Discours antillais (1981) [translated by J. Michael Dash in Édouard Glissant, Caribbean discourse: selected essays, University of Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1989]. Through his essays, novels and poetic texts, which are interwoven, he gradually introduced the notion of "Tout-Monde" [the Whole-world], the title of the 1995 novel, followed by the essay Traité du Tout-Monde in 1997 [translated by Celia Britton, Treatise of the Whole-world, Liverpool University Press, 2020]. From 1980 to 1988, Glissant was Editor-in-chief of the UNESCO Courier, developing its editions in 36 languages, distributed in more than 150 countries. In 1988, Glissant moved
to the United States and became Professor in the Department of French and Francophone Studies at the Louisiana State University (LSU). In 1993, he was actively involved in the founding of the International Parliament of Writers, an international institution aimed at establishing solidarity with persecuted writers and intellectuals. In 2006, Glissant created the Institut du Tout-Monde, with the support of the Conseil Régional d’IIe de France, the Ministère de l’Outre-Mer, and the Maison de l’Amérique Latine.

In 2009, Glissant published his last essay, Philosophie de la Relation, subtitled Poésie en étendue, and as his final work in 2010, La terre, le feu, l’eau et les vents – Une anthologie de la poésie du Tout-Monde.

Nan Goldin

Nan Goldin was born in Washington D.C. in 1953. She lives and works in New York City. One of the most important and influential artists of her generation, Goldin has revolutionized the art of photography through her frank and deeply personal portraiture. Over the last 45 years, Goldin has created some of the most indelible images of the 20th and 21st centuries. Since the late 1970s her work has explored notions of gender and definitions of normality. By documenting her life and the lives of the friends who surround her, Goldin gives a voice and visibility to her communities. In 2017 Goldin formed the activist group P.A.I.N. (Prescription Addiction Intervention Now) which stages protests aimed at US pharmaceutical drug companies.

Goldin’s work has been shown recently at the Tate Modern, London (2019); the Château de Versailles, France (2018); Château d’Hardelot, Condette, France (2018); the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2017); the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2016); Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam, Netherlands (2010); Louvre Museum, Paris, France (2010); and a major traveling mid-career survey which began at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York in 1996 and travelled to Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Germany; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, The Netherland; Fotomuseum Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland; Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Austria; and the National Museum, Prague, Czech Republic.

She has been the recipient of many awards including the Ruth Baumgarte Award, Sprengel Museum, Hannover, Germany (2019); the Centenary Medal, London (2018); the Hasselblad Award, Gothenburg, Sweden (2007); the Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres, France (2006); and the DAAD, Artists in Residence Program, Berlin (1991).

Derek Jarman

Derek Jarman (1942-1994) was an English artist, film maker, stage designer, diarist, author and gardener. He was educated at the King’s College London and at the Slade School of Art. In 1967 Jarman exhibited his paintings in Young Contemporaries, Tate Gallery, London; the Lisson Gallery, London and Fifth Biennale des Jeunes Artistes, Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris.

Jarman worked as a set designer on Jazz Calendar, The Royal Ballet, London (1968); Don Giovanni, ENO, London Coliseum (1968) Ken Russell’s feature film The Devils (1971) and Savage Messiah (1972); The Rake’s Progress, Maggio Musicale, Firenze (1982) among others.

In the early 70s Jarman began an extensive series of film works made Super 8mm followed by his first full-length feature film Sebastiane in 1975. He then went on to make a further ten feature films including Jubilee (1978); Angelic Conversation (1985); Caravaggio (1986); The Garden (1990) and Edward II (1991). His final film Blue was first shown at the Biennale Arte, Venice in 1993.

Selected solo exhibitions: Sarah Bradley’s Gallery, London (1978); Edward Totah Gallery, London (1982); ICA, London (1984); Richard Salmon Ltd., London (1987); Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester (1994); X Initiative: Phase I, New York (2009); Derek Jarman Super 8, Julia Stoschek, Dusseldorf (2010).

Jarman also wrote several books, including the autobiographical Dancing Ledge (1984) and two volumes of memoirs, Modern Nature (1992) and At Your Own Risk (1992). Derek Jarman’s Garden, which documents the creation of his extraordinary garden at Dungeness, was published in 1995.

Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz began her career as a photojournalist for Rolling Stone in 1970, while she was still a student at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her pictures have appeared regularly on magazine covers ever since. Leibovitz’s large and distinguished body of work encompasses some of the most well-known portraits of our time.

Leibovitz’s first major assignment was for a cover story on John Lennon. She became Rolling Stone’s chief photographer in 1973, and by the time she left the magazine, ten years later, she had shot one hundred and forty-two covers and published photo essays on scores of stories, including her memorable accounts of the resignation of Richard Nixon and of the 1975 Rolling Stones tour.

In 1983, when she joined the staff of the revived Vanity Fair, she was established as the foremost rock music photographer and an astute documentarian of the social landscape. At Vanity Fair, and later at Vogue, she developed a large body of work—portraits of actors, directors, writers, musicians, athletes, and political and business figures, as well as fashion photographs—that expanded her collective portrait of contemporary life. In addition to her editorial work, she has created several influential advertising campaigns, including her award-winning portraits for American Express and Gap. She has also collaborated with many arts organizations. Leibovitz has a special interest in dance and, in 1990, she documented the creation of the White Oak Dance Project with Mikhail Baryshnikov and Mark Morris.

Exhibitions of Leibovitz’s work have appeared at museums and galleries all over the world, including the National Portrait Gallery and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.; the International Center of Photography in New York; the Brooklyn Museum; the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam; the Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris; the National Portrait Gallery in London; the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia; and the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow.

Vue de La Face cachée de l’Archive, espace dédié à l’exposition A Box of Ten Photographs, 1970 de Diane Arbus, située dans la Galerie des Archives Vivantes, La Tour, LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers, France.

Vue de La Face cachée de l’Archive, espace dédié à l’exposition A Box of Ten Photographs, 1970 de Diane Arbus, située dans la Galerie des Archives Vivantes, La Tour, LUMA Arles, Parc des Ateliers, France.

Marc Domage

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